The Republicans Hate You (via Queer Landia)

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The Republicans Hate You Don’t believe it?  Here’s a short list of things they did in the House of Representatives’ Armed Services Committee on Thursday morning: Approved, by a 33-27 vote, to require all four Service Chiefs to certify that the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell will not hurt the troops ability to fight.  Presently the law requires the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, the Defense Secretary, and the President to certify that DADT can be safely rescinded.  It seem … Read More

via Queer Landia

Busy Day for Marriage Equality (via Queer Visalia)

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Busy Day for Marriage Equality A flurry of activity today regarding marriage equality: The Department of Justice has released a statement saying they will no longer defend cases currently in court, or future cases that may be filed, where citizens have sued over the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act.  In the opinion of the President and the Attorney General, Section 3 of DOMA is unconstitutional, and will no longer be defended by the Justice Department.  The Hou … Read More

via Queer Visalia

1,138 Federal Rights I Don’t Have

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gay wedding ringsFrom Equality Across America.org

Many have asked about the rights and benefits that are denied to same-sex couples. Following is a summary report from the GAO of the 1,138 federal rights and benefits provided via DOMA to married couples. These rights don’t even begin to address the those granted to married couples by the state.

Defense of Marriage Act: Update to Prior Report
GAO-04-353R January 23, 2004

Summary

The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) provides definitions of “marriage” and “spouse” that are to be used in construing the meaning of a federal law and, thus, affect the interpretation of a wide variety of federal laws in which marital status is a factor. In 1997, we issued a report identifying 1,049 federal statutory provisions classified to the United States Code in which benefits, rights, and privileges are contingent on marital status or in which marital status is a factor. In preparing the 1997 report, we limited our search to laws enacted prior to September 21, 1996, the date DOMA was signed into law. Recently, Congress asked us to update our 1997 compilation. We have identified 120 statutory provisions involving marital status that were enacted between September 21, 1996, and December 31, 2003. During the same period, 31 statutory provisions involving marital status were repealed or amended in such a way as to eliminate marital status as a factor. Consequently, as of December 31, 2003, our research identified a total of 1,138 federal statutory provisions classified to the United States Code in which marital status is a factor in determining or receiving benefits, rights, and privileges.

Click to download the full report.

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